Current Affairs

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Should Millennials Rent or Buy?

Should Millennials buy or rent a home?When choosing between renting or buying a home, only 37 percent of Millennials today opt for ownership, according to a report from the Urban Institute. That’s 8 percentage points lower than the two previous generations at the same age (24-35 years). Reasons range from personal preference to economic reality, or a combination. Should Millennials rent or buy a home?

Personally, I am in my mid-twenties and am still building up savings. My husband also has a highly mobile job. Settling in one place for many years is not an option right now. We currently rent our home for those reasons.

For others our age, factors include delaying marriage, large student debt and a preference for living in high-cost urban areas. According to a report at housingwire.com, the average mortgage payment for the U.S. median home in 2018 was $1,578, compared to an average monthly rent of $1,267. When faced with these costs and the reasons listed above, renting is usually the option Millennials choose.

Should Millennials rent or buy a home? Ultimately, the decision depends on one’s current financial situation and readiness to make a long-term commitment in purchasing a home.

For those who can afford a down payment and closing costs, have a stable job in their location of choice, or are ready to start a family, buying can be a sound investment. People who need flexibility, aren’t sure where they want to put down roots, or have substantial debt, renting may be a better option. Working with a financial planner can help you figure it out.

Written by Alicia Vallee, a Phoenix-based freelance writer.

Secure Personal Data

Secure personal dataIt may seem complicated to secure personal data on all your electronic devices. Shannon Curkendoll, operations manager and portfolio administrator, offers simple tips to make the task less daunting. Take a moment to watch her brief video. She explains how to lock your devices and create strong passwords you can remember.

 

 

For more great insight on how to secure personal data, check out Shannon’s article on how to understand and reduce Wi-Fi risk.

Understand and Reduce Wi-Fi Risk

By |May 6th, 2019|Current Affairs, Video Blog|

Consistent Saving is a Vital Habit

About 58 percent of Americans have less than $1,000 in personal savings, according to a recent survey by gobankingrates.com. If we think about all the federal employees impacted by the current government shutdown, that means six out of 10 will likely experience financial difficulty due to this interruption in their incomes and lack of savings. A government shutdown is rare. Still, it is a powerful reminder to us all to be prepared for unexpected loss of income or large expenses. Consistent saving is a vital habit.

Having an emergency savings account (for things like a broken water heater, automobile repairs or unplanned medical bills) can save you a lot of anxiety. It can save you hundreds of dollars, as well, since late fees for credit cards, car loans or utility bills often run $30 or so per month. Having an emergency reserve will also help you maintain a good credit score during challenging financial times.

When speaking to young adults, I often recommend they keep $1,000 to $1,500 as a minimum target for a checking account. Adults with children or additional financial responsibilities should set a higher reserve target. The savings not only helps in an emergency, it helps you avoid monthly bank fees that can add up quickly. If you can set aside $20 per week (only about $3 a day), you will have accumulated $1,000 by the end of the year.

Once you have your emergency fund in place, you can focus on your retirement savings. Setting up an automatic deposit from your paycheck into a retirement account is one of the easiest ways to save money. That money never reaches your checking account, so it is less likely to be spent. For 401k contributions, start with 5 percent of your salary or enough to receive any company-matching contributions. After a few months, you will hardly miss the smaller amount going into your checking account.

Consistent saving is a vital habit that lasts a lifetime. Taking that first step is important. According to US Census data, the median household income was $60,336 in 2017. For a typical 40-hour work week at that income, $5 is equivalent to about 10 minutes. Wouldn’t investing just 10 minutes (or $5) a day be a worthwhile investment in yourself?

By |February 4th, 2019|Current Affairs, Financial Planning, Retirement|

3 Cyber Security Tips for Travelers

cyber security tips for travelersHelp keep your personal data safe while you’re on the road with these quick cyber security tips for travelers from Norton.

  1. Lock your devices: Most smart phones, laptops and tablets will allow you to lock the device using a PIN number or fingerprint ID. In the event that any of your devices have been momentarily misplaced or forgotten, this will be the first line of defense against a security breach.
  2. Use caution with public internet: Free Wi-Fi access is appealing when you travel but is also particularly vulnerable to security issues. Avoid unencrypted networks, and ask your hotel about its security protocol before connecting to the Web. If you must use public Wi-Fi, avoid accessing personal accounts or sensitive data while connected to that network.
  3. Disable Bluetooth: Just like your phone’s automatic Wi-Fi connectivity, Bluetooth connectivity can present problems. Bluetooth signals can come from anywhere. If your Bluetooth is left on, nearby assailants can connect to your phone and potentially hack into your device. Keep Bluetooth disabled as much as possible while traveling.

For more tips from Norton, especially for business travel, click here. You can also read more articles on cyber security from the Perspective team by clicking here.

By |January 21st, 2019|Current Affairs|